East Sacramento Preservation Essay

Unknown-2Sticks and Stones

by Pat Lynch

In an open hearing on McKinley Village Midtown councilman Steve Hansen spoke dismissively of the sometimes heated nature of East Sacramento public discussions. “That’s not us,” he said sternly to the Midtowners. It reminded me of the way I used to talk to fourth graders. “We’re not like those noisy third-graders,” I’d say in yet another futile effort to establish dominance. Oddly, the audience made no objection to Hansen’s condescending manner. Maybe they were used to it. Maybe some of them liked it. Six or seven East Sacramentans attended but none of us jumped up and launched into any tirades. There were outbursts from others however. A couple of men blurted loud, hostile remarks about McKinley Village and one woman, when it was her turn to speak, tried to wrest the microphone from Hansen’s hand. He wouldn’t let go. “I hold the mike,” he said. “A control freak,” she answered, refusing to relinquish it. Both of them clutched it throughout her comment.

 

Later I asked a Midtown woman why Hansen spoke disparagingly, and wrongly, of East Sacramentans. We are indeed a free speech zone but he mischaracterized our public gatherings. She said it was Divide and Conquer. She maintained that developers and the city officials who collude with them don’t want neighboring groups to form effective coalitions.  “It’s just politics,” she said.

 

Politics. And politics, of course, is about power and people’s relationship to power. The perceived power of even a city council office can make some citizens embarrassingly deferential. Worse, it can give the minor elected functionary an inflated regard for his significance and encourage him to publicly speak ill of other neighborhoods.

 

It’s worthwhile to note that nobody accused East Sacramentans, (East Sacramento Preservation members in particular) of inappropriate outspokenness when we had many conversations with Stonebridge developers about the project that will replace Sutter Hospital. Stonebridge solicited our input and received it. We forged a productive relationship, and on March 7th East Sacramento Preservation president, Ellen Cochrane, spoke to the Planning Commission in support of the project. Now Stonebridge will bring new and welcome residents to our community, won’t increase our traffic problems, will give new families a chance to thrive in a livable environment. We’re glad to have played a part in something that actually is good infill.

 

But when we opposed the McKinley Village proposal because it’s traffic invasion will ruin our streets and its other multiple hazards degrade the environment, the false judgments arrived. A few claimed we were “anti-growth.” This, after our productive commnication with and endorsement of Stonebridge, was mystifying, but we have learned not to expect high caliber reasoning from everyone. Then we have “radical,” the tag that we are supposed to refute by timidly allowing dangerous development. But if it’s radical to follow our charter, which tasks us with defending our neighborhood, then so be it. If it’s radical to stand with the Environmental Council of Sacramento and Physicians for Social Responsibility, both of which have serious misgivings about McKinley Village, so be it.

 

We will be certainly be subjected to even more imaginative misnomers in the future, but that’s the price of advocacy. We’ll survive. We’ll continue to try our best. And while some have attempted to dismiss or marginalize us, we have seen this: since we took a stand critical of McKinley Village our blog following has increased. Public meetings got larger. Our Save East Sac signs began popping up everywhere. An influx of new memberships filled the P.O. box. The phone keeps ringing. People show up. Now this is smart growth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to East Sacramento Preservation Essay

  1. John Allen says:

    As I look at the actions of our so-called “representatives,” and their contempt for the people they are charged to represent, I start to ask, where is democracy anymore? There seems to be no longer any place for the demes or “people” which make up democracy, or “people power.” Instead, we are expected to remain content with a supposed representative form of government. Come on, when was the last time you actually truly remember an elected official actually representing the people, and not special interests?
    As I watch what is happening in Ukraine, I ask myself, are things really that much different at times? They have their “deep government”, oligarchs and “politicians” who only represent the interests of the few. The people in the Maidan have bravely shown the world what the force of “people power” can do. Perhaps it is time for us to start taking more of a cue from their actions.
    To begin with, we need to make it perfectly understood that any politician who doesn’t truly represent the democratic voice and wishes of the people, can then expect to have a very short political future. Many are jockeying for election to higher office or for re-election, and they need to be reminded in no uncertain terms that the people can and will withhold their vote. Then there is that form of direct democracy first used by Californians in 1903, the recall election. It helped to remove political “machines” and their political operatives from office. Perhaps it is time to remind our elected officials that they ultimately serve at our pleasure, and not the other way around. Either way, it will no longer be business – and I mean bu$ine$$ – as usual!

  2. John Allen says:

    As I look at the actions of our so-called “representatives,” and their contempt for the people they are charged to represent, I start to ask, where is democracy anymore? There seems to be no longer any place for the demes or “people” which make up democracy, or “people power.” Instead, we are expected to remain content with a supposed representative form of government. Come on, when was the last time you actually truly remember an elected official actually representing the people, and not special interests?
    As I watch what is happening in Ukraine, I ask myself, are things really that much different at times? They have their own form of “deep government”, oligarchs and “politicians” who only represent the interests of the few. The people in the Maidan have bravely shown the world what the force of “people power” can do. Perhaps it is time for us to start taking more of a cue from their actions.
    To begin with, we need to make it perfectly understood that any politician who doesn’t truly represent the democratic voice and wishes of the people, can then expect to have a very short political future. Many are jockeying for election to higher office or for re-election, and they need to be reminded in no uncertain terms that the people can and will withhold their vote. Then there is that form of direct democracy first used by Californians in 1903, the recall election. It helped to remove political “machines” and their political operatives from office. Perhaps it is time to remind our elected officials that they ultimately serve at our pleasure, and not the other way around. Either way, it will no longer be business – and I mean bu$ine$$ – as usual!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *